Forbes, Reminding Everyone That It Knows Jackshit

Via foreboding Forbes in a fallacious #farticle:

U.S. policymakers are engaged in the usual wailing and gnashing of teeth, fulminating about the threat to American security and debating which unsatisfactory course of action Washington should next take. There is almost unanimous agreement that the DPRK poses a serious, if not currently the most serious, international danger facing America.

But the threat is largely self-induced. That is, Washington could easily deflate the fantastic nightmare of a North Korean nuclear attack on America by leaving the Korean peninsula.

source

The emphasis is all Ddong Today and really, the only two things that will be accomplished with an American pull out on the Korean peninsula will be:

  1. The South Korean government, opposition groups, chaebols, etc. will loose their favorite boogeyman/scapegoat and be forced to look inward for malcontents and only be able to come up with “immigrants” which will be the start of a backlash/purge of darker skinned folks from parts of lesser Asia and the Middle East (where “lesser” = poorer than South Korea which is basically every country except Japan and China; UAE, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia).
  2. China will flex more muscle in the region, increase its bullying showdowns in the West Sea and sink more South Korean fishing boats and Coast Guard vessels.

Forbes is shitting armchair analysis of a country most of their staff probably couldn’t name 10 brands from or a single province or name five cities. They also probably don’t know that South Korea has had an incredibly puny defense budget for so long, that an American pull out would leave the country ill-equiped to fend off aggressors. (Heck, the government removed most of the anti-tank barriers north of Seoul in 2006).

There is a standing army and mandatory military service and the ROK marines are hardcore, but the defense of the country has been strategized for the last 60 years with the US right there. Having troops arrive after a conflict has started from Japan and Guam might not be good enough.

Forbes’ farticle has a page 2:

But the U.S. could take one simple step which would transform the Korean conflict. Washington should end its security guarantee to the South and phase out American troops. While offering their diplomatic assistance, U.S. policymakers should turn over responsibility for dealing with the North to its neighbors.

There is no “one simple step” here. Pulling 30,000 troops and support and logistics out of anywhere is not “one simple step”. And Accomplishment #1 (above) would slow down, delay, and possibly even derail or perpetually sabotage the “one simple step” from ever happening. South Korea needs the US presence for more than just defense posture—not having to maintain a huge military budget means most Koreans pay a paltry 3.3% of their earnings in taxes. (Yes, this is another way, a much bigger way, that American tax dollars subsidize the South Korean economy even with the local government picking up most of the yearly costs of stationing US soldiers on its lands). 

Forbes also seems to think that ending a security guarantee is a good thing to do. This would have repercussions with other, present tense allies already nervous about the Trump agenda. Worse, breaking a security guarantee would definitely have repercussions with other, future tense allies—potential friends needed in situations unfathomable right now asked to do things for a guarantee that would mean a lot less if one had been broken in the past because it was politically convenient. 

Ddong Today should also mention a third, somewhat hidden accomplishment:

  1. All those Korean products Americans love so much, the Hyundai cars, the Samsung washing machines, the LG phones, etc. would be a lot more expensive once the tax burden in South Korea increased significantly and the country’s citizens could no longer pay the inflated prices offered for the identical items in the South Korean marketplace. Once South Koreans stopped subsidizing Korean goods at home, prices in America would rise to normal and no longer be as competitive further sealing the economic down spirals (unless America got giddy for cheap Chinese knockoffs again, it’d be back to Japanese gadgets or ass expensive Korean ones). 

tagged as: , forbes, , ,