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  • ddt 10.56 on February 15, 2017  

    Item #5 in a Google Search for “DAPL”

    This is part of how to win an idea war: by dumping your version of the facts into every accessible slot. For Friends of Ddong Today, you might as well call this post “This Is How to Loose, exhibit 23”. The US is deep into a massive propaganda war of ideas about the world and how stuff should be and it’s a war that’s been going on since before the internet was born … 

    Instead of sharing into the vacuum of Facebook, reactive content needs to be created independently and put out there, then shared back into Fakebook and everywhere else. This is a fantastic example of how to fight this long war:

    On the left is the website dakotaaccesspipeline.net with a counter factsheet to the Energy Transfer Partners propaganda site daplpipelinefacts.com. The reactive site has ripped off the whole look, feel, and content of the pro-pipeline/pro-oil fact sheet, but interjected the missing factoids. Dakotaaccesspipeline dot net’s only problem is it’s the only such site. There should be hundreds like this. There should be one up for every person who thinks Energy Transfers is full of crap.

    … but there isn’t a 100 counter-sites and that’s the problem.

    For every quality source, there are 100s of “alternate fact” sources out these to debunk it, tear it up, and remix it into an alternate alt-rite message.

    Writing about this stuff on a closed, proprietary, corporate, Trump-backing (Peter Thiel) platform does do anything. It is a waste of energy to share things on Facebook.

    #dronesmotherfucker 


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  • ddt 08.04 on February 13, 2017  

    What We Talk About When We Talk About the Internet

    What we think of as the internet has been under assault for years, perhaps even more than a decade, and to be honest, the nature of the assault has been vastly brushed over because for the longest time, the internet was place for a few kinds of information we could afford to not take seriously. Stuff like cats battling it out with lightsabers, lists of every cultural and literary appropriation of the phrase ‘bad boys’, random meme generators, quick checks of whats-her-face in that movie, and hundreds of other bits of uselessness have become such a staple of two generations that it’s gobbled up the two before it (aka the “my mom is on Facebook” and “my grandpa tweets” phenomena) and has eaten its way into all the others that are up-and-coming. 

    It’s been a sick, fun ride that’s made a handful of people very, very, very rich. It’s also been a host of other things that aren’t that great. The internet has devastated mom-n-pop shops of all kinds (bookstores, video stores, copy shops). The internet has shredded most traditional media. Where Americans sat and watched the 5, 6, and 11’o clock news for basically 50 years, now most Americans get their news in fragments, sped-read across multiple sources. The veracity and integrity of “the media”—and let’s not get carried away here, the old model sucked and was either too liberal or too conservative (depending on who you talked to), but there were still standbys and a few names folks felt they could trust. This is almost all gone now. In another four years, or eight years, news, as we know it today, will be gone. This isn’t an alt-rite thing, this isn’t a Trump thing, this is what happens when there is a cultural shift in the way people relate to technology and each other in the same time period. The old systems don’t survive, they sort of adapt, cling, stagger, droop, and eventually die. Slowly. Think horses to cars; acoustic to electric; landline to cellular.

    Since the early days of the world wide web, AOL, news groups and the like, the idea of being anonymous has been appealing and the fear of loosing that anonymity has shaped most of the arguments over the internet since. For a while it was cookies, web sites set little files on your computer called cookies that tracked your habits, remembered your preferences and this freaked folks out. Then it was less than 1kb invisible images that couldn’t be blocked like cookies could. And later “browser profiles”, how your browser is configured leaves a footprint that can be tracked across the internet. Groups like the EFF work to keep these things private so folks can continue to have believe they have privacy (Snowden taught us better). 

    In the years leading to where we find ourselves today, news channels, newspapers, and urban legends would conjure the almost monthly story on the ‘evils of the internet’ with sensationalist headlines: Internet Safety for ChildrenHow Kids Fool Their Parents on Social NetworksRising Number of Kids Exposed to Online PornThe Undercover Parent, etc. All of these stories focus on the need for children to “understand the dangers” and suggestion some sort of parental supervision. This is where the dialog end for nearly everyone, if they bothered to start it at all. Yes, children are at risk, yes parents should monitor their children’s online behavior to the point of using spyware because it’s the responsible thing to do.

    We don’t talk enough about how everyone must be vigilant, how everyone should deal with cyberbullying, how families should keep an online eye on each other, much like they would if a family member were crossing the street. It’s that basic, but it’s also worse than that basic example. 

    For every company with an internet platform which exists to coral folks into groups and push ads in front of them or to harvest everything online keystroke for meta-data and then sell that information, millions of people willingly give up their most precious information: their address, their phone number, their status, their age, their income, etc. Companies are not responsible for the safeguarding of that information. If they loose it, you loose your account. If they get hacked, you loose your account (and a lot more if your password was 123456gg). Companies are not libel for not protecting your precious information. If you had a Yahoo! account anytime in the last 10 years, all of that data is being trafficked on the internet. If your Yahoo password was used for another account, that information is also being trafficked on the internet. The CNN article is a fucking joke of victim blaming:

    Use different passwords for all online accounts
    Beware of emails asking for more information
    Block access to your credit report

    They mention some of the fault is on Yahoo!:

    Companies need to step up security measures to protect themselves not only against hacking, but also against the aftereffects of hacking like credential stuffing attacks … “The trust that your users have in you is directly tied to the level of security they expect … If you don’t have confidence [in Yahoo] in the future, that’s a personal decision people need to make …

    Yahoo! rejected the repeated advice of their own security staff which is why they’re an easy target for this class-action lawsuit. There is no law and it’s not common policy for companies to detail what happens in case of a breach to your data or what (fi any) responsibility they have to protect that information. This is one of the most fucked up and least talked about things about the internet today.

    This exposure, this complete disregard for privacy in a constant race to fatten the wallets of a few isn’t as nasty as the internet has become.

    The worst of the internet is driven by three things laid out above (perhaps indirectly, so): money, privacy, lack of responsibility. To say that we, the users of the internet, are wholly in charge of those three things is what the Flim-Flam Man says with his wagon of broken trinkets as he blows through town. The suggestion that internet consumers users can walk off of a platform like Yahoo! to something else to show their displeasure is about as helpful as suggesting a family pick up and move house because the faucet water is toxic (hello Flint critics)—it has no basis in reality. One doesn’t just pull 50GB of photography, thousands of followers, and move to another Flickr. Media consolidation has had that ill effect on the internet too, just as much as not actually being in possession of those thousands of followers has had an ill effect (e.g. no client / benefactors list to move; just like no other house to move to when your water is poisoning you). 

    People are products of the web pages they log into in any equation where the company behind that page draws a single penny of profit from the existence of that person’s account. 

    These companies don’t get (not yet) that they have to protect their product.

    This means policing your platform. Companies should start by taking a stronger position on hate speech, then work down from there by employing well-train, human readers (and not algorithms) to sort things out. 

    This means not carving your platform into silos and attempting to milk coin from everyone. Companies should start by keeping everyone in the same pool, let users decide who they do and do not want to listen to or talk with.

    This means, and some aren’t going to like this, striping away the privacy. Companies should start by forcing users to use their legal name—Facebook has already started this, Twitter shoulda started long ago.

    This means protecting user data like IP, on a secure server, locked up, with limited access. Companies should have been compelled by law to do this from the beginning, and this is unlikely to become law under the Trump administration—watch the Yahoo! class action lawsuit; also watch the Verizon / Yahoo! deal, the outcome of those things will determine what happens next.

    This means separating freedom of speech from harassment (from “having fun” to criminal). Real, legal names go a long way here. There’re good reasons and background to support this move, read: And Then the Breitbart Lynch Mob Came for MeLeslie Jones Twitter Racism; Gamergate; How the Alt-Rite Influenced Trump Supporters’ Language on Facebook (“a large-scale analysis of 8,215,332 comments from 1,734,738 different accounts” … accounts, not people); Amid the Chaos in Berkeley, a Grinning Face, Covered in Blood (the nefarious case of Eddy Brock).

    #dronesmotherfucker


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  • ddt 15.29 on February 6, 2017  

    Wild Echo Chambers

    Meet our friend Hoaxy. We tasked Hoaxy with the phrase “crowd size”, and this (above) is what Hoaxy spat back: data, lots of data. What Hoaxy does is track stories across the and then separates the data it collects into two, color-coded sets. One set for “claims” and one set for “fact-checks”. While still in beta, what Hoaxy does is important because it presents us with tangible, visible clusters of information and tells us how and information is being distributed across the internetz and where the hubs of “claims” and “fact-checks” are. On the left side, Hoaxy graphs the increase in frequency of the search word or phrase corresponding with a date (note the January 21 spike). Best of all though, Hoaxy shows relationships between those hubs and everything else (on the right side; the wibbly wobbly timey wimey stuff).

    When the colors are revealed (above), Hoaxy’s data shows which locations on the internetz are restating claims and which ones are stopping to fact-check. For example, the node “realDonaldTrump”, in the cluster (above, right) is purple and the branches from it are 50/50 orange (fact-check) and purple (claim). This half those who read a claim about crowd size (our search phrase) wrote about the claim and fact-checked it—shown in a purple node, to orange branch, to orange node. 

    The masses of purple are equally insular in all of Ddong Today’s test searches with Hoaxy. These purple tumors with no orange intersects are where the alt-rite live, read, bitch, and plot. This is what an alt-rite echo chamber looks like (above, centered around Alex Jones).

    A side effect of Hoaxy is the blunt demonstration of the two halves of the political spectrum which rarely engage each other …


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  • ddt 03.50 on February 3, 2017  

    TIME Editors Say, “Fuck It”

    Is Steve Bannon the Second Most Powerful Man in the World?

    TIME editors throw in the towel before week 2 of the Trump administration comes to a close (or maybe they just fired senior editors that didn’t wanna play scratch backs). Seriously, either they know Betteridge’s Law of Headlines or they just don’t give a shit anymore.


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  • ddt 22.15 on January 31, 2017  

    Meet the FEWP

    Last weekend was all fakeout, execute real business, watch, purge. What Ddong Today will refer to from here on as a FEWP.

    You’re lying to yourself, your family, your friends if you think either of these things:

    1. that was the last FEWP
    2. so what (aka Obama did same/worse)

    Last weekend was not normal. This is not fine.

    This is not good for the country. This will not make America great again.

    Consolidating power into the hands of less people, stymying voices of objection, purging those who disagree, demoting those with more experience—these things have all been done before and have been proven each time to make those in power more powerful at the cost of striping it from others almost always through violence and subjugation. 

    #dronesmotherfucker #fewp

    From the article:

    Protestors get all kinds of feel-good that they’re among fellow believers and standing up for what’s right, and they go home feeling like they’ve done their part. Even if protestors gain mild, symbolic concessions, the fact that their anger has an outlet is useful to the other side. Do protest, but be very wary of going home feeling like you’ve done your job. You haven’t.

    Protesting is not the same as action, not the same as writing, not the same as taking a picture, not the same as using a law degree to take on an executive order. Being seen is good, numbers are good (coz if anything, numbers really irk the president), but it is a limited act. 

    Information gets harder to come by when power gets consolidated. We have information now … later, it might not be so. 


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  • ddt 15.38 on January 31, 2017  

    READ: Anti-Muslim Ban Responses from Strongest to Weakest

    Interesting are the degrees with which each company takes its position. Facebook sounds complacent and ready to serve their new master. (figures though, Zuckerburg is to the 2010s what Bill Gates was to the 1990s). Maybe Tim Cook didn’t like his Cheerios and couldn’t focus on a final proof of Apple’s statement. It lacks the defiance of say, holding ground against bullshit requests from the FacebookI and then the government to build backdoors into its products. Then the rebel rousing tones from Y Combinator and Box. 

    That Adobe put out such a pitiful response shouldn’t make anyone feel guilty ever for pirating their software. 😉 #dronesmotherfucker


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  • ddt 13.13 on January 31, 2017  

    Coming Soon to a 7-11 Near Everyone

    Wacky tobaccy. That’s right. Let’s assume, based on the last few days that President Trump gets a full eight year ride. There’s simply too much money in weed to not legalize. And the new president likes making money. And there’s the matter of too many uptight millennials who won’t do what they’re told. Remember that it’s Huxley’s Brave New World (and so many others after it) where the citizens take a drug called soma which deals with “any residual unhappiness” [sourceIn the 1998 made-for-tv adaptation of Brave New World (IMDB), as Peter Gallagher’s Bernard Marx voices worry about “the savage”, his coworker says, “Take a soma and I don’t give a damna.” [no source]

    Ddong Today bets that marijuana will be legal in most parts of the USA by 2020. There’s too much money to be made (by white folks) and the States that continue to flip the bird at this administration and its commands will have to have income to stay afloat.

    #ddongtoday #dronesmotherfucker 


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  • ddt 06.39 on January 31, 2017  

    Resources

    Google docs to bookmark, contribute to, and build on:


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  • ddt 10.33 on January 29, 2017  

    The new immigration executive action is racist. Showing preference for Christians doesn’t make it any less racist. 

    This weekend, it’s Muslims because that kind of ban is easy to push. But next weekend, next month, next year? Who else does the US not like? What other group(s) of people does Trump’s America disdain? 

    This ban is biased guilt by association. You are from a Muslim country. Terrorists are Muslim. Therefore, you are a terrorist.

    This logic is faulty and can and will be applied (as all things are once they are in play) to other groups, religions, and nations the Trump administration does not approve of.

    Let’s talk about Korea. For so many Americans there is only North Korea. Americans are barely cognizant of a South Korea (although Samsung may have helped to change that until their phones began exploding). The faulty logic drapes nicely here. The continued fear of a DPRK ICBM striking America will easily drive a Korean travel ban with average Americans not batting much of an eye based on other, racial stereotypes of Koreans (they eat dogs, they are shitty drivers, most of the woman are prostitutes).

    As an American citizen living abroad with a South Korean wife and child, we have been slowing building a 4-6 year exodus plan to live in America. To be near my family and to live with more space and more culture. The thought of living in America seems more and more distant with this administration. We already live in a country that denies asylum seekers bases on the color of their skin. We already live in a country that is xenophobic, where the average Joe Kim discriminates against anyone who is not of his race, his culture, his country. If the prospect of moving becomes which mildly oppressive, racist government do we want to live under, which is better? 

    The answer is the one where: the most money can be saved and the best healthcare can be had. Sadly, that looks to be less and less like America. 

    Given the way the week has fallen, orders signed, actions signed, making America great again looks to be mostly about making America white, Christian, and unforgiving. 


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  • ddt 09.52 on January 29, 2017  

    Total madness The order blocked travelers from entering…

    Total madness:

    The order … blocked travelers from entering the country and airlines barred visa-holders from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, as well as people from those countries who are lawful U.S. residents, from getting on planes to the country.

    source

    To return, these folks will undergo “extreme vetting”. The United States of America is only going to let the good Jews Muslims in from now on. Christians get “priority” processing. 


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  • ddt 19.24 on January 27, 2017  

    Somewhere in this land, lay an ancient alien artifact which instills realignments of the persona. Until it’s found, settle for GQ’s makeover machine:


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  • ddt 13.00 on January 26, 2017  

    This Coming Age of Silence

    Another day, another batch of executive orders, another round of reactions, worries, celebrations, and memes. There are so many stories to sift through. There is so much exhaustion of eyes, of minds, of rage, of delight. Five days in and people are unplugging from SNS (social network services) (social network services) (social network services) (social network services), filling their feeds with cats, LOLz, hot chicks, hotter guys, and Obama-nostalgia posts. 

    Not even a week has passed and these things have changed for the next four years:

    There is some good reporting and writing going on too, but not enough. These are all worth your reading time:

    Lastly, watch and remember this: Lest We Forget – Bill Moyers and four historians on the big lie behind the rise of Trump.

    #ddongtoday #dronesmotherfucker


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  • ddt 05.25 on January 25, 2017  

    Day … Fuck Your Echo Chamber

    If you thought Ddong Today was going to give you a day-by-day commentary on the Trump administration, then you were wrong. Day-by-days are a joke, a way to affix a false sense of chronology to a period of time to remember it better or more neatly. MSM does day-by-days and then they  stop because that stops selling content and when that happens it gets a lot harder to sell advertising. We will see “week 1” or “the first week” commentaries soon enough and later, “first month”, then “the first 100 days”, and finally, “the first year”. Recap, summarize, distill to the sound byte, and sell—that is our system. 

    There’s too much going on to keep shoehorning into day-by-day posts. Already this browser is bloody with pinned tabs, so much to say and so little time and space and time to say it in. So many issues, the obvious things, the executive orders, the reactions from the right and the left, the schisms, and the unobvious things. 

    We are four days into President Trump’s vision of America. It is not great again, and in many ways, America looks the same as it did last week. But the mood is different—very different. We are four days in and already folks are worn out. How can we tell? Simple: there is no protesting and the meming is way up. 

    (from the left on the left)

    Yes, Spicer and Conway sound like they are talking straight from 1984 .

    Yes, that is disturbing, but how many of President Trump’s cabinet have seen a 1984 movie or read the book? If they had read the book or even seen the movie, their spin doctors would take greater care in how their message is being crafted. They may think their words are smart and original, but without the background knowledge of how things change into absolute authoritarianism, e.g. from news to newsspeak, their self-preception of how they choose to speak seems efficient to them, rather that completely scary to the folks who have read the book; necessary to them rather than dangerous to the folks who have read the book. In this case, attaching their words to those of George Orwell then, means nothing. This meme will travel the leftie echo chamber and everyone will go, “See! These people are insane and power-hungry. They want control. We have to stop Trump.” 

    (from the right on the right)

    Yes, we live in America (or abroad with our American passports). Yes, that is our flag. Yes, that is the president. And, yes, that is how it works.

    Yes, maybe folks should sit down and accept what has come to be … only that isn’t how we all grew up. The American way is to stand up for yourself, for what you believe in. Hollywood movies and hundreds of tv shows repeat these themes throughout our childhoods, teens, and adulthood. We don’t just accept something because someone said so. This sounds great if you’re into this administration. These are all the facts needed to layout why protesting is wrong. No sane American can deny the truth in this meme. It is real. It is life. It is now. (And it isn’t a loose comparison to a book Joe Blow read in middle school). This meme has folks in the righie echo chamber going, “That’s right. You don’t like it? Leave.”

    #ddongtoday #dronesmotherfucker #smashtheechochamber


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  • ddt 20.42 on January 24, 2017  

    Those Skills are Gone, Mr. President

    It’s actually a great plan and alluded to on Ddong Today earlier … but there aren’t enough folks left in all of America with the technical skills required to build even a small Death Star. Not even one to match the size of the president’s ego head. Those skills are long gone. China would have to step in and build it for us.

    So what to do?

    A wall.

    Building a wall will create hundreds of thousands of jobs.  


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  • ddt 14.14 on January 24, 2017  

    As one city fingers its policy at the new administration, this exchange comes to mind:

    Governor Tarkin:
    The Imperial Senate will no longer be of any concern to us. I have just received word that the Emperor has dissolved the council permanently. The last remnants of the Old Republic have been swept away.

    General Tagge:
    But that’s impossible. How will the Emperor maintain control without the bureaucracy?

    Governor Tarkin:
    The regional governors now have direct control over their territories. Fear will keep the local systems in line. Fear of this battle station.

    source

    Without a battle station (Death Star), and other than pulling Federal funding, there’s little Trump can do (legally) to keep the local systems (states, counties, cities) in line. Except tweet-rage about … maybe.

    #ddongtoday #watchandlisten


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  • ddt 12.11 on January 24, 2017  

    Punching Nazis

    Putting things into the contexts in which we were raised:

    • Nazis = bad
    • Nazi haters = good
    • fighting Nazis = good
    • not fighting Nazis = bad
    • punching someone because you don’t like what they say = bad
    • punching someone because they are going to hurt you = okay

    This code wasn’t remembered, a friend had to point it out, and that friend is right. As much as we loathe Richard Spencer, he has as much right as any American to stand on a corner anywhere in America and talk. That is a 1st Amendment right. There are exceptions to that right (read this to understand), which as clearly seen in the video, Spencer was not in or even veering towards. This is a video of an assault. If Spencer filed a police report, the law would be on his side, even if most folks are not. 

    There is a mob mentality as we push forward into the Trump era. Folks are pissed. Looking for things to push back against. And pushing back by decking a guy talking on a street corner because we don’t like him is a bad play. Other than coded hate speech, Spencer has no crime under the Constitution (though one could make a case that shouting “Hail Trump” and alluding to the “Lügenpresse” is a kind of incitation of impending violence by evoking Hitler’s brand of fascism, which would fall into the realm of the earlier referred to exceptions of the 1st Amendment—seriously, read the link). 

    More troubling is the willing acceptance of punching out Spencer as the right thing do because it is an American thing to do. This creates a fallacy in ‘the American way’ way of life:

    Indiana Jones punching a Nazi for self-defense (Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade) and Captain America punching out Hitler in a room of soldiers with guns versus an unarmed, non-hate speaking (in the video) Richard Spencer getting punched in mid-sentence. Two of these things are justifiable, one is not. The action of a solitary, anonymous, white man punching Spencer is that it makes Spencer the clear victim. It allows folks to see him as human, as needing protection, as just-a-guy-some-people-don’t-like, as a hero. We don’t need and can’t afford to create martyrs of anyone in the alt-rite movement or any other cluster of folks who don’t agree with the core tenents of what we might call, being a decent fucking human being:

    • non-discriminatory against anyone’s race, class, sex, or orientation 
    • accepting of otherness—specifically religions, gender identities
    • non-exclusionatory politics
    • empathic of those in need—specifically refugees
    • philanthropic

    Nick Spencer, perhaps most famous for writing the Captain-America-is-really-a-Hydra-agent comic book storyline (pro-tip: Hydra = Nazis), made a similar distinction between punching Nazis and punching Spencer:

    The NYT ran an article of its own: Attack on Alt-Right Leader Has Internet Asking: Is It O.K. to Punch a Nazi? Not many saw or read this article, but Betteridge’s Law of Headlines says, ‘No, it isn’t O.K. to punch a Nazi.’

    Remember too, that President Trump on the campaign trail last year advocated similar violence against protesters at his rallies.

    The martyrization of Spencer, the lawlessness of him getting punched in the face on the street, the ‘yays’ of the internetz, the memes that have followed all contribute to the climate of hate and intolerance propped up by Trump himself (and, historically, many others). Folks on the internetz reacting without thinking or “memeing” without considering is not new. Those acts are part of the reason we now call Trump, President Trump.

    Because Spencer is the victim, he and the alt-rite can milk the situation for everything it is worth and more. It is worth a lot, partially because Spencer had fallen to the sidelines of the national consciousness since the inauguration, now he has another 15 minutes to shame America and surely some will wonder why we have free speech at all (and it’s clear that is one direction the Trump administration is pushing—last push, read the link about 1st Amendment exceptions). The solitary, anonymous, white man violated Spencer’s “safe space” (yes, the alt-rite has hijacked terminology created for anyone but white men). Using that language, the video, and everything thing else, there is a bounty on that solitary, anonymous, white man’s nameExpose The ANTIFA Who Sucker Punched Richard Spencer.

    Ponder that for a moment. 

    A bounty. Not for a head. Not dead or alive.

    A bounty for a name.

    What happens to this solitary, anonymous, white man once his name is known to the alt-rite. What happened to the Jews between the walls? What happened to the freedom fighters in the basement? What happened to the black man on his way home?

    But this is 2017, you say. Okay. This is what will happen to the solitary, anonymous, white man once his name is known to the alt-rite in 2017:

    • he will definitely be given a black eye, but probably much worse (the Nazi way)
    • he will probably be doxed (see ‘doxing‘)
    • he will be harassed at his place of work
    • he will be harassed at home
    • his family, if he has one, will be threatened
    • the police will probably not be able to help him since none of the perpetrators will be known

    Folks on the internetz are aware of the bounty and the ramifications of it, and in typical internetz fashion have attached a hashtag to the situation #IPunchedRichardSpencer. The idea is to flood the internetz with so many people claiming to be that solitary, anonymous, white man that the alt-rite won’t be able to find him. 

    It doesn’t work like that and the hashtag isn’t as proactive or as useful as say, trying to get the site to pull the bounty. The hashtag is the same kind of passive interaction, sharing and tagging in place of speaking and acting, that folks now see as “doing something” to “make a difference” because it’s “better than doing nothing.” But hashtagging and posting is, in fact, doing nothing. Like thousands of folks updating their Facebook statues to show them “at” Standing Rock is doing nothing. Hashtags are meant to gauge popular interest in topics and rank them on a page or make popular topics easy to find, that’s all they do. To wield hashtags in a polarizing way, they have to be coordinated, even loosely, between folks. That is doing something. 

    Doing something would be to try to get the bounty pulled from Wesearchr whose tag line is: Crowdfunding the Truth.

    There’s no truth to be had in outing an assault perp, only vengeance and lawlessness. Wesearchr’s own terms & conditions page makes a good case for pulling the bounty: 

    User Content

    The term “User Content” means any information, text, graphics, video, or other material of any kind whatsoever that you post on the Site or otherwise submit to us. This term includes within its scope (without limiting the generality of the foregoing) both (i) anything that an Asker posts to the Site or otherwise submits to us in order to initiate or oversee a Bounty; and (ii) anything that a Researcher submits to the us as a proposed Answer to a Bounty or in connection therewith.

    You represent, warrant, and agree that you will not contribute any User Content or otherwise use the Services in a manner that:

    1. infringes, violates or otherwise interferes with any copyright or trademark of another party;
    2. reveals any trade secret, unless the trade secret belongs to you or you have the owner’s permission to disclose it;
    3. infringes any intellectual property right of another;
    4. unlawfully violates the privacy or publicity rights of another;
    5. discloses any information that you are contractually obligated to refrain from disclosing;
    6. is libelous, defamatory, indecent, abusive, harassing, threatening, or otherwise violates any law or right of any third party;
    7. creates an impression that you know is incorrect, misleading, or deceptive, including by impersonating others or otherwise misrepresenting your affiliation with a person or entity;
    8. contains other people’s private or personally identifiable information without their express authorization and permission;
    9. contains or links to a virus, Trojan horse, worm, time bomb or other computer programming routine or engine that is intended to damage, detrimentally interfere with, surreptitiously intercept or expropriate any system, data or information; and/or
    10. contains links to other sites that contain the kind of content that falls within the descriptions set out in (a) through (i) above.

    The Wesearchr FAQ page states that the site can’t be used for doxing … :

    Can I use WeSearchr to dox or harass people?
    No. WeSearchr is a journalistic enterprise that publishes information of journalistic value that is in the public interest. Bounties seeking information that is not publishable or is not of any journalistic relevance will not be approved. All Proposed Bounties are reviewed by WeSearchr senior editors before being opened for contributions.

    It’s doubtful, though subjective, that outing the man who punched Spencer is of journalistic interest and the way the internetz work and the rise of CCTV, it’s equally doubtful that he will remain anonymous for very long now that the police have been involved.  


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  • ddt 16.49 on January 23, 2017  

    The internetz, relentless as ever, does not disappoint. Less than 24 hours after the “alternate facts” spin/FAIL, we get: The Little Golden Book of Alternate Facts to help guide us through these trying times.

    https://scontent-icn1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16195462_10154268562278873_2322380296629313591_n.jpg?oh=8d678ee7b4a76b119386d2c7ab8ecf7f&oe=59065E9E


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  • ddt 07.34 on January 23, 2017  

    Day 2 – Lies, Damned Lies, and Alternate Sets of Facts

    President Trump visits CIA headquarters to tell spies how awesome they are and how much he loves them. Pretty epic given the constant disses of the last few weeks. Meanwhile, Sean Spicer (above), edgy, nervous, and clearly pissed chastises the press for false reporting “at a time when our nation and the world was watching the peaceful transition of power[1] (emphasis ddt). Much has been made of “the peaceful transition of power” this year and President Trump’s infamous refusal to promise it, made everyone press it even more, certain that he would loose and his supporters would make trouble. But President Trump didn’t loose and “the peaceful transition of power” is evermore a phrase to hold over people.

    We’re going to see this a lot, as folks object to things, to actions or inactions, and happenstances. There’s a dangerous parallel that some will draw between speaking out against a governmental policy and advocating open rebellion. It’s clear that, as Americans, all of us do in fact support the peaceful transition of power, otherwise this fiasco would either have already ended or we would be watching block-by-block gun battles on BBC and Al Jazeera.

    Back to the press core …

    Spicer insists as his boss insists, that the 2017 inauguration was attended by more people than any other inauguration in history—this has been refuted by every source except the White House and the alt-rite press, some focusing on the MLK angle more and the end bit (not transcribed yesterday):

    “There’s been a lot of talk in the media about holding President Trump accountable. Well, I’m here to tell you that it goes two ways. We’re going to hold the press accountable as well. The American people deserve better,” Spicer said. “And as long as he serves as the messenger of this incredible movement, he will take this message directly to the American people where his focus will always be.”

    source

    Mildly threatening (“We’re going to hold the press accountable”), partially coded (“this incredible movement”)—this is the stuff of dystopian films and television. This on top of other language also mildly threatening and also sometimes coded, e.g. “Make America Great Again”—the interpretations are endless. This language could mean nothing … or it could mean whichever extremist paranoia fits one’s socio-politcal strata. Few folks find these phrases comforting or reassuring.

    Some sites, like this one,  aren’t even “the press”, yet are participating in the fake news as the administration is calling inauguration day attendance numbers. There are few ways to hold everyone accountable for one set of truth where everything else is a lie. There is no peaceful transition of power involved in any of those ways. This is why Spicer’s words are mildly threatening (if not outrightly so).

    A peaceful transition of power is less a positive, naturally occuring process of a country each time those in government or just out of that government repeat the phrase.


    The internetz are brutal about facts, in some circles. If you say it, it’d better be true, because if it isn’t, there are four or five folks who seem like they’ve been sitting around all day just waiting to tell you how wrong you are. We all seem used to that, but the new administration is from that other part of the internetz, the famous alt-rite echo chamber. When the internetz started to hammer on Spicer’s words, we learned that he was giving “an alternative set of facts.”

    This is nothing new. This is one of those science-isn’t-real-god-is type of utterances. Some schools now teach intelligent design alongside natural selection because it is ‘an alternative set of facts’. Kellyanne Conway, is pulling from another alt-rite language point and clearly, Chuck Todd has never actually had to deal with a science denier and gets owned by the illogic. It’s funny to watch if you’ve had to deal with illogic or a science-denier. When Popular Science killed off its comments section in 2013 in part because of illogic and attacks on science itself, everyone should have sat up and taken note that idiocracy was actually a “thing”.

    Intelligent design and natural selection are theories, not facts. The number of people at the 2017 inauguration, is currently also a theory and will remain so until there are independent counts completed and those rely on aerial photography and a lot more analysis than there has been time for in this nascent presidency.

    The real problem is that millions of people are caught up in this idiocy. Not one American should be giving a shit how many people showed up to President Trump’s inauguration. It’s just not important. The lying, is a little bit important … but not really. That President Trump is a liar is not news. That his staff would lie for him or to boost his image is not news. None of this is news.

    The real news is on the sidelines. You have to watch for it.

    The real news is stuff like this bill, which would never have a chance of passing, has a chance now, under the new administration and Congress. This bill … it’s like that time when Popular Science turned off its comment section. Sit up and take note.

    #smashtheechochamber #dronesmotherfucker #ddongtoday


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  • ddt 19.48 on January 22, 2017  

    Y = C+G+I+NX, Baby

    A non-American family member asked today, “So, what are you gonna do?”.
    “Nothing. We are fucked.”

    If we do nothing we are fucked. If we try and fail, at least we can know that we did something. If we try and succeed, we think things will be different, better, how we don’t know, but the idea is that it won’t be what we find ourselves in today—incessant bickering across the SNS (social network services) stratosphere about how many people showed up to whose party. In other words: we know it won’t be high school. Whatever future there is going forward, at least (we hope), it’s got to be better than high school braggarts in the capitol and on the screens going round after round of I’m-right-and-you’re-wrong.

    If this is you, right now, on the internetz or in a bar, talking about this … this cruft of the inauguration, you’ve already lost. You’re already doing nothing if you are mindlessly sharing a comparative picture of Obama’s 2009 inauguration and the 2017 inauguration. If you’re not looking at the sources, you’ve lost. If you’ve taken at face value, any part of the MLK bust removed from The Oval Office—be it as the 😱-what-a-monster (leftie) or the LOOK!-fake-news (rightie), you’ve lost.

    The truth, the news, is somewhere in the middle. You have to think for yourself to find it. You have to read between the lines. You have to talk with people who agree with you and those who do not. Most of all, you have to listen.

    If you’re not listening, then you’re doing nothing.

    #dronesmotherfucker #ddongtoday

    Y = C+G+I+NX

    The first thing that America has lost is prosperity. How do I know? The fundamental equation of macroeconomics says so, without a shred of doubt. Y = C+G+I+NX. Don’t be scared. It’s much simpler than it looks. It just means: GDP = Consumption + Government expenditure + Investment + eXports.

    source


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  • ddt 12.47 on January 22, 2017  

    Why Can’t Anyone Count?

    Check out this CNN site with a thingamajig called a “gigapixel”:

    http://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2017/01/politics/trump-inauguration-gigapixel/

    It’s a massive, scrollable photograph of the inauguration. Be sure to swing a hard right with your mouse/finger and check the massive cluster of people that reaches back to the Washington Monument.

    Whatever the National Park Service (NPS) retweeted, they’ve been forced to delete it. And when putting sooo much faith in their counting, remember that they undercounted the Million Man March in 1995 (emphasis mine):

    within 24 hours after the March there arose a conflict about crowd sizeestimates between March organizers and Park Service officials. The National Park Service issued an estimate of about 400,000 attendees, a number significantly lower than March organizers had hoped for. After a heated exchange between leaders of the march and Park Service, ABC-TV-funded researchers at Boston University estimated the crowd size to be about 837,000 members, with a 20% margin of error.

    Vox is pimping the “no one showed” up story, but the images they have are from probably 30 minutes before CNN’s gigapixel shot was taken. And this tirade isn’t helping:

    Yesterday, at a time when our nation and the world was watching the peaceful transition of power, and as the president said, “The transition and the balance of power from Washington to the citizens of the United States.” Member … some members of the media were engaged in deliberately false reporting. For all the talk about the proper use of Twitter, two instances yesterday stand out. One was a particularly egregious example in which a reported falsely tweeted out that the bust of Martin Luther King Jr. had been removed from The Oval Office. After it was pointed out that this was just plain wrong, the reporter casually reported an con … tweeted out that a Secret Service agent must have just been standing in front of it. This was irresponsible and reckless. Secondly, photographs of the inaugural proceedings were intentionally framed in a way … in one particular tweet to minimize the enormous support that had gathered on the National Mall. This was the first time in our nation’s history that floor coverings have been used to protect the grass on the mall. That had the effect of highlighting any areas were people were not standing, while in years past the grass eliminated this visual. This was also the first time that fencing and magnetometers went as far back on the wall preventing hundreds of thousands of people from a … being able to access the mall as quickly as they had in inaugurations past. Inaccurate numbers involving crowd size were also tweeted. No one had numbers because the National Park Service, which controls the National Mall, does not put any out. By the way, this applies to any attempts to try to count the number of protesters today in the same fashion. We do know a few things, so let’s go through the facts. We know …”

    He then goes into “the facts” as the White House is choosing to spin them today. He goes on about the great reception President Trump received this place and that place, takes a dig at the Democrats, mentions Canada and Mexico. Then chastises the press for not writing about those things. Finally, he follows it all up with a schedule of what President Trump will do tomorrow before walking out.

    It’s easy to miss in the video and maybe in the transcript, too, but the harshness of the press secretary’s tone when he says, “This was irresponsible and reckless.” This is the sitting government adding a layer of aesthetic interpretation to what is being said about them in a public forum. Other governments have done this too, it’s not special, unique, or even worrisome per se, but it is very worthy of note here, because this is presented within a larger context of “fake news”. The reporter says it was a mistake. Brietbart calls it “Fake News on Day One“. Ddong Today calls it ‘jumping the gun’.

    Whatever it was, it is no more irresponsible and reckless than any number of things that have gone down since this fiasco started with a rant about raping Mexicans.

    Forget the numbers and counting, as stated in the Vox article, real counts aren’t known for days or weeks until after an event. The thing to watch are the press conferences, the tone the White House sets down as “acceptable” (e.g. not irresponsible, not reckless), and what other stories, events, people, facts, etc. will fall into the newly defined category of ‘irresponsible and reckless’.

    #blasttheechochamber #ddongtoday

    Update:

    Slate has a comparison of Twitter cover images when the @POTUS Twitter account flipped over. Some President Trump staffer uploaded a picture of Obama’s 2009 inauguration. Of course someone caught it and so there is media fodder about it.

    These “mistakes” feel more like digs and FUs than ignorance. It takes energy to do stuff like this and unless that image was just one in a default upload folder. And President Trump himself has shown again and again that he’s a big fan of the petty dig.

    Meanwhile the counting continues …


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Ddong Today


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